Testing a JS WebApp

Пост доступен на сайте softdroid.net: Тестирование приложения JS WebApp.

Test Requirements

I’ve been putting off testing my cleopatra project for a while now https://github.com/bgirard/cleopatra because I wanted to take the time to find a solution that would satisfy the following:

  1. The tests can be executed by running a particularly URL.
  2. The tests can be executed headless using a script.
  3. No server side component or proxy is required.
  4. Stretch goal: Continuous integration tests.

After a bit of research I came up with a solution that addressed my requirements. I’m sharing here in case this helps others.

First I found that the easiest way to achieve this is to find a Test Framework to get 1) and find a solution to run a headless browser for 3.

Picking a test framework

For the Test Framework I picked QUnit. I didn’t have any strong requirements there so you may want to review your options if you do. With QUnit I load my page in an iframe and inspect the resulting document after performing operations. Here’s an example:

QUnit.test("Select Filter", function(assert) {
  loadCleopatra({
    query: "?report=4c013822c9b91ffdebfbe6b9ef300adec6d5a99f&select=200,400",
    assert: assert,
    testFunc: function(cleopatraObj) {
    },
    profileLoadFunc: function(cleopatraObj) {
    },
    updatedFiltersFunc: function(cleopatraObj) {
      var samples = shownSamples(cleopatraObj);

      // Sample count for one of the two threads in the profile are both 150
      assert.ok(samples === 150, "Loaded profile");
    }
  });
});

Here I just load a profile, and once the document fires an updateFilters event I check that the right number of samples are selected.

You can run the latest cleopatra test here: http://people.mozilla.org/~bgirard/cleopatra/test.html

Picking a browser (test) driver

Now that we have a page that can run our test suite we just need a way to automate the execution. Turns out that PhantomJS, for webkit, and SlimerJS, for Gecko, provides exactly this. With a small driver script we can load our test.html page and set the process return code based on the result of our test framework, QUnit in this case.

Stretch goal: Continuous integration

If you hooked up the browser driver to run via a simple test.sh script adding continuous integration should be simple. Thanks to Travis-CI and Github it’s easy to setup your test script to run per check-in and set notifications.

All you need is to configure Travis-CI to looks at your repo and to check-in an appropriate .travis.cml config file. Your travis.yml should configure the environment. PhantomJS is pre-installed and should just work. SlimerJS requires a Firefox binary and a virtual display so it just requires a few more configuration lines. Here’s the final configuration:

env:
  - SLIMERJSLAUNCHER=$(which firefox) DISPLAY=:99.0 PATH=$TRAVIS_BUILD_DIR/slimerjs:$PATH
addons:
  firefox: "33.1"
before_script:
  - "sh -e /etc/init.d/xvfb start"
  - "echo 'Installing Slimer'"
  - "wget http://download.slimerjs.org/releases/0.9.4/slimerjs-0.9.4.zip"
  - "unzip slimerjs-0.9.4.zip"
  - "mv slimerjs-0.9.4 ./slimerjs"

notifications:
  irc:
    channels:
      - "irc.mozilla.org#perf"
    template:
     - "BenWa: %{repository} (%{commit}) : %{message} %{build_url}"
    on_success: change
    on_failure: change

script: phantomjs js/tests/run_qunit.js test.html && ./slimerjs/slimerjs js/tests/run_qunit.js $PWD/test.html

Happy testing!

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